A serious security flaw has just been discovered that could potentially put millions of devices at risk when connecting to the internet through a Wi-Fi connection.

This flaw doesn’t target a particular type of device or a specific piece of software – rather, the security hole is in how the Wi-Fi standard itself operates. As explained by Engadget, the flaw – which has been dubbed “Krack Attack” – could potentially allow hackers to steal secure information such as passwords and payments details. Broadly speaking, this issue means hackers could impersonate existing Wi-Fi networks, examining all browsing data and web traffic made through the connection.

In essence, the issue means hackers could impersonate existing Wi-Fi networks, examining all browsing data and web traffic made through the connection. It’s the result of certain implementations of the WPA2 encryption used by Wi-Fi connections re-using key combinations that should be unique to each connection.

The good news is that additional security protocols in iOS mean iPhones and iPads should be safe from this particular flaw. It’s another example of the extra emphasis Apple place on user security and privacy compared with other companies. Android devices, meanwhile, are particularly susceptible. If you ever use a non-iOS device that connects to the internet it may be worth disabling Wi-Fi until a fix is released – something that we expect to happen very soon.

If you’re still worried, read our top tips for keeping your private and personal data secure.